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2014 Course Offerings

Of Cherry Trees and Washington DC: Japan and the United States (Poli Sci)
Life, Death, the Beautiful and the Dysfunctional: A Survey of Japanese Literary Genres (Literature)
Love in the Japanese Film (Film Survey)
Basic Japanese I
Basic Japanese II
Intermediate Japanese I
Intermediate Japanese II

Each student is required to enroll in exactly 2 courses.
Please note that some are cross-listed and therefore offered at the same time. Each student should choose the level most appropriate for his/her academic career.
Two Japanese language courses will be offered based upon student enrollment. If you wish to sign up for Japanese language and are not sure which level is right for you, email us.
You will be expected to indicate your course preference when you fill out the online application, including alternate choices.


Proposed 2014 Class Schedule
First period: 9:00 - 10:30 am
Life, Death, the Beautiful and the Dysfunctional:
A Survey of Japanese Literary Genres


Second Period: 10:45 am - 12:15 pm
Of Cherry Trees and Washington DC: Japan and the United States
or
Basic Japanese II
Tomodachi Program (during lunch) 12:15 - 1:10 pm
Third Period: 1:10 - 2:40 pm
Love in the Japanese Film
or
Basic Japanese I
All classes meet Monday through Friday unless a special program event is scheduled. Our schedule follows the Doshisha University class schedule, as their academic term is in session. So our students are going to and coming from classes at the same time as the "regular" Doshisha students.
 
 

Of Cherry Trees and Washington DC: Japan and the United States

POLI 4990

Instructor: Lauren McKee

Course Description:

The planting of cherry trees in Washington D.C. originated in 1912, when the first trees were given as a gift of friendship from the People of Japan to the People of the United States. The first shipment of trees from Japan to DC, regrettably, had to be completely destroyed as they were deemed infested with insects that could damage the American cherry tree. After much distress and diplomatic apologizing, the mayor of Tokyo agreed to send another shipment of trees, all of which were planted on the White House grounds or around the northern bank of the Tidal Basin, now the location for many American memorials. Washington’s famed Cherry Blossom Festival and Sakura Matsuri grew from this simple act of planting trees into a national festival attended by hundreds of thousands of people from all around the world every spring in Washington D.C.

The story of these cherry trees serves as a powerful metaphor for the complicated relationship between the United States and Japan, one often based on misunderstandings and perceived contradictions within the behavior and attitudes of the other. This course examines the relationship between two of the most important and powerful countries of the 20th and 21st centuries. After introducing students to the history of political relations between these two countries, we will examine a series of international problems that the US and Japan must confront together, as well as the future course of the relationship between the US and Japan.

Textbooks:

US-Japan Relations in a Changing World by Steven K. Vogel Modern Japan: A Social and Political History by Elise Tupton You Gotta Have Wa by Robert Whiting

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Life, Death, the Beautiful and the Dysfunctional:
A Survey of Japanese
Literary Genres

ENGL 4391

Instructor: Lauren McKee

"Young people get the foolish idea that what is new for them must be new for everybody else too. No matter how unconventional they get, they're just repeating what others before them have done"
Yukio Mishima, After the Banquet

Description: Japan is a country with a rich literary history that speaks of beauty and achievement as well as disaster and trauma. This course will examine the common themes of Japanese literature with a survey of short stories, novels, poems and novellas by Japanese authors whose works have been translated into English. Focusing primarily on modern works of 20th and 21st centuries, students will read literary classics such as Mishima’s Temple of the Golden Pavilion and Soseki’s Kokoro as well as contemporary works such as Murakami’s Kafka on the Shore and Yoshimoto’s Kitchen. Though varied in form and content, these works all address central themes of Japanese literature, including ill-fated love, tragic friendship, obsession with beauty, and the death of loved ones. Students will be evaluated based on their preparedness and participation in class discussions, as well as their weekly reading responses and a final class presentation based on those responses. Additionally, students are required to complete an 8-10 page paper based on a topic approved by the instructor.

Readings:

  • The Gothic Tale of Longing (Short Stories): “The Tattooer” (Jun’ichiro Tanizaki); Tales of Moonlight and Rain (Ueda Akinari)
  • Unrequited and Dysfunctional Love (novels): Snow Country (Yasunari Kawabata); Kokoro (Natsume Soseki)
  • Obsession with Beauty (novel): Temple of the Golden Pavilion (Yukio Mishima)
  • Dealing with a Political Past (short stories): Rashomon and 17 Other Stories (Ryunosuke Akutagawa)
  • The Pastoral (haiku): Collected Poems of Matsuo Basho
  • The Tragic Journey (novel): Kafka on the Shore (Haruki Murakami)
  • Death and Remembering (novel): Kitchen (Banana Yoshimoto)

Love in the Japanese Film

FTCA 2090-92

Instructor:  Laszlo Fulop

Description:This course will focus on the exploration of the theme of love (romantic, familial, patriotic, etc.) in the cinematic traditions of Japan. Through specific films that deal with this subject matter, students will learn about the major directors and cinematic trends of the Japanese film. Students will also learn about the technical, aesthetic, narrative, and commercial development of the cinematic art form in this culture. Students will study the influences at work on Japanese cinema as well as the specific distinctions between Japanese film and other traditions, such as the Hollywood film.

 

 
 

Basic Japanese I (1st semester course)

JAPN 1001

Instructor: Noriko Lastrapes

Description: Practice of Japanese language for four basic skills: beginners, reading, writing, listening and speaking.  Reading and writing words, phrases, simple sentences and passages in hiragana, katakana and about 40 kanji; Engaging in simple conversations about topics introduced in Lessons 1-5 of Genki I, An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese. 3 credit hours

Text, Workbook and CDs:

  • Textbook: Banno, Eri et al, Genki I, An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese, Tokyo: The Japan Times, 2011 (2nd edition).
  • Workbook with CD: Banno, Eri et al, Genki I, An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese, Tokyo: The Japan Times, 2011 (2nd edition)
 
 

Basic Japanese II (2nd semester course)

JAPN 1002

Instructor: Noriko Lastrapes

Description: Continuing practice of Japanese language for four language skills: reading and writing, listening and speaking for students who have basic grammar and about 40 kanji knowledge and are fluent with hiragana and katakana: Reading and writing hiragana, katakana and about 100 kanji; Engaging in simple conversations about topics introduced in Lessons 6 -10 of Genki I, An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese.

Text, Workbook and CDs:

  • Textbook: Banno, Eri et al, Genki I, An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese, Tokyo: The Japan Times, 2011 (2nd edition).
  • Workbook with CD: Banno, Eri et al, Genki I, An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese, Tokyo: The Japan Times, 2011 (2nd edition)

 

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Intermediate Japanese I (3rd semester course)

JAPN 2001 (Independent work: special departmental permission is required to enroll)

Instructor: Noriko Lastrapes

Description: Continuing practice of Japanese language for four language skills: reading and writing, listening and speaking for students who have basic grammar and about 100 kanji knowledge and are fluent with hiragana and katakana: Reading and writing hiragana, katakana and about 190 kanji; Engaging in simple conversations about topics introduced in Lessons 11-15 of Genki I and II, An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese. (Student can choose Lessons 13-17 or Lessons 13-18 of Genki II that may be equivalent to the 3rd semester Japanese course at their home school.)

Textbook, workbook & CDs:

  • Textbook: Banno, Eri et al, Genki I, An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese, Tokyo: The Japan Times, 2011 (2nd edition).
  • Workbook with CD: Banno, Eri et al, Genki I, An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese, Tokyo: The Japan Times, 2011 (2nd edition)
  • Textbook: Banno, Eri et al, Genki II, An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese, Tokyo: The Japan Times, 2011 (2nd edition).
  • Workbook with CD: Banno, Eri et al, Genki II, An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese, Tokyo: The Japan Times, 2011 (2nd edition).


Intermediate Japan II (4th semester course)

JAPN 2002 (Independent work: special departmental permission is required to enroll)

Instructor: Noriko Lastrapes

Description :Continuing practice of Japanese language for four language skills: reading and writing, listening and speaking for students who have basic grammar and about 190 kanji knowledge and are fluent with hiragana and katakana: Reading and writing hiragana, katakana and about 270 kanji; Engaging in simple conversations about topics introduced in Lessons 16-20 of Genki II, An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese. (Alternative: Student can choose any series of 5 or 6 lessons like Lessons 18-23 or 19-23 from the Genki II that would be equivalent to the 4th semester Japanese course level at their home school.)
.

Text, Workbook and CDs:

  • Textbook: Banno, Eri et al, Genki II, An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese, Tokyo: The Japan Times, 2011 (2nd edition).
  • Workbook with CD: Banno, Eri et al, Genki I, An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese, Tokyo: The Japan Times, 2011 (2nd edition)

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For more information, please call or email us.
Office telephone: (504) 280-6388; or UNOJapan@uno.edu

 

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