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2015 Course Offerings

Recent Japanese History
Consuming Japan: The Politics of Food
Basic Japanese II
Philosophy and Film
Contemporary Japanese Literature

Each student is required to enroll in exactly 2 courses.
Please note that some are cross-listed and therefore offered at the same time. Each student should choose the level most appropriate for his/her academic career.
Two Japanese language courses will be offered based upon student enrollment. If you wish to sign up for Japanese language and are not sure which level is right for you, email us.
You will be expected to indicate your course preference when you fill out the online application, including alternate choices.


Proposed 2015 Class Schedule
First period: 9:00 - 10:30 am
Recent Japanese History

Second Period: 10:45 am - 12:15 pm
Consuming Japan: The Politics of Food
or
Basic Japanese II
Tomodachi Program (during lunch) 12:15 - 1:10 pm
Third Period: 1:10 - 2:40 pm
Philosophy and Film
or
Contemporary Japanese Literature
All classes meet Monday through Friday unless a special program event is scheduled. Our schedule follows the Doshisha University class schedule, as their academic term is in session. So our students are going to and coming from classes at the same time as the "regular" Doshisha students.
 
 

 
 

Recent Japanese History

HIST 2991

Instructor:Dr. David Rands

Description: This course offers a broad introduction to the history of Japan since the end of the Pacific War (the theater of World War II fought in the Pacific and East Asia).  It will consider major topics in Japan's modern history and will seek to provide students with the historical background necessary for evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of contemporary Japan, as well as the continuities and discontinuities in Japanese society today.  3 credit hours


Consuming Japan: The Politics of Food

HUMS 2090

Instructor: Dr. Lauren McKee

Course Description:

Food and politics are never very far apart. Romans gave their serfs “bread and circuses” to keep them from rebelling; Marie Antoinette famously uttered, “Let them eat cake”; even Herbert Hoover promised Americans a “chicken in every pot” should they elect him in the 1920s.
In Japan, food also has much to say about society and politics; economics and trade; male and female roles; national identities; regional disputes; and global forces. This class aims to explore the politics of Japanese food both as a domestic product and global commodity by relating consumption to economic flows, cultural practice, foreign policy, and globalization. 3 credit hours

Textbooks:

Food and Culture: A Reader, 2nd edition, by Carole Cunahan

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Basic Japanese II

JAPN 1002

Instructor: Dr. David Rands

Description: Practice of Japanese language for four basic skills: beginners, reading, writing, listening and speaking.  Reading and writing words, phrases, simple sentences and passages in hiragana, katakana and about 40 kanji; Engaging in simple conversations about topics introduced in Lessons 1-5 of Genki I, An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese. 3 credit hours

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Contemporary Japanese Literature

ENGL 2090

Instructor: Dr. Lauren McKee

Description:This course proposes to examine political and social change in post-Meiji Japan (roughly 1868 to the present) through the reading of contemporary Japanese literature. The course goals are both stylistic and thematic, among them to: provide a historical context for reading texts; demonstrate Western literary influences in Japanese literature; identify Japanese themes and styles of writing; examine these themes in the context of a historical, social and political progression since the Meiji Restoration. 3 credit hours

 

 
 

Philosophy and Film

PHIL 3260

Instructor: Dr. Mark Phillips

Description: This course is a critical study of the relation between philosophical concepts and the medium of film, which examines the unique manner in which film conveys ideas that are arguably too complex for more traditional media.  Through a survey of films whose content illustrates philosophical ideas, as well as a variety of philosophical sources, students learn about the ways in which film can "bring to life" philosophical concepts like no other medium (and how potential filmmakers might utilize philosophical ideas in the production of their own work). 3 credit hours

 

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For more information, please call or email us.
Office telephone: (504) 280-6388; or UNOJapan@uno.edu

 

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