We hope to see you in Costa Rica this summer!

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SUMMER 2018 COURSE OFFERINGS



Class Number: Class Title:
ENGL 2090/4391 Special Topics in Literature: Magical Realist Fiction in Latin American Literature
ENGL 2090 Special Topics in Literature: Contemporary Travel Writing in Latin America
ANTH 3750 Food and Culture in Latin America
SPAN 1001 Basic Spanish I
SPAN 1002 Basic Spanish II
SPAN 2001 Intermediate Spanish I
SPAN 2002 Intermediate Spanish II
SPAN 3031 Spanish Conversation
SPAN 3191,92,93 Independent Work

Course Descriptions

Class Number:

Class Title:

 
ENGL 2090/4391 Special Topics in Literature: Magical Realist Fiction in Latin American Literature  

Class Instructor: Dr. Lisa Verner

Class Description: 3 cr.

CATALOG DESCRIPTION                 
Whereas Magical Realism embraces many artistic forms, including painting and film, we most often associate the literary variety with Central and South America. As a movement, Magical Realism is broadly defined as occurring when magical and unrealistic elements invade an otherwise realistic and rational literary world and are accepted as unexceptional components of the narrative. The magical or fabulous elements of the literature are meant to represent the deeper truths of the characters, themes, and plots. This course will offer students a survey of Magical Realist Fiction in representative stories, novellas and novels from Central and South American authors. The course will require two papers and a final exam, each of which will constitute 30% of the student’s grade; class participation will make up the remaining 10% of the grade.

Required Texts

Jorge Luis Borges, “The Aleph” & “The South”

Octavio Paz, “My Life with the Wave”

Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Innocent Erendira and Other Stories

Carlos Fuentes, Aura

Laura Esquivel, Like Water for Chocolate

 

Class Number:

Class Title:

 

ENGL 2090

Special Topics in Literature: Contemporary Travel Writing in Latin America

 

Class Instructor: Dr. Lisa Verner

Class Description: 3 cr.

CATALOG DESCRIPTION  
This course will explore the joys, pitfalls, and insights of travel through a study of contemporary travel writing about Latin America. We will consider the challenges of rendering one’s experience of travel, complete with its discoveries and aggravation, into entertaining and expressive prose through an examination and critique of an assortment of 20th/21st century travel writers. We will discuss the impact of history, politics and gender on the authors’ narratives, and we will pay particular attention to the accusations of exoticism and stereotyping often leveled at first-world authors who write about developing nations. We will be careful to remain alert to the influence of ideology, both that of the authors and our own, on the literature of travel and our reactions to that literature. The course will require two papers and a final exam, each of which will constitute 30% of the student’s grade; class participation will make up the remaining 10% of the grade.

Required Texts

Mary Morris, Nothing to Declare

Tim Cahill, excerpts from Hold the Enlightenment, Pass the Butterworms, Pecked to Death by Ducks, and A Wolverine Is Eating My Leg

Excerpts from Outside Magazine’s Points Unknown: The Greatest Adventure Writing of the Twentieth Century

P.J. O’Rourke, “The Innocents Abroad, Updated,” “Panama Banal,” “Christmas in El Salvador,” and “Thirty-Six Hours in Managua—An In-depth Report” from Holidays in Hell

Jan Morris, “Confusions in Paradise: The Caribbean” from The World: Life and Travel 1950-2000


 

 

 

Class Number:

Class Title:

 

ANTH 3750

Food and Culture in Latin America

 

Class Instructor: Ann Edwards

Class Description: 3 cr

CATALOG DESCRIPTION  

Examination of human diet and nutrition from an evolutionary and ecological perspective and the sociocultural and biological dimensions of food practices. Topics include the social roles of food: why we eat what we eat and with whom. Also discussed are food taboos and beliefs, food getting and preparation, changing food habits, contemporary problems of food production and malnutrition, and the effect of cultural and environmental influences on nutrient intake.

PROFESSOR’S ADDENDUM – This course will try to answer such basic questions as: who eats what, why, when, how and with whom? Since Latin America is a vast region of fascinating contrasts in terms of dietary and culinary customs, we shall explore the ways in which food reflects and is integrated in the everyday lives of the Costa Ricans. We will take advantage of being (and eating) in a foreign culture by getting students out of the classroom and into the field to explore food and culture. The class will visit places that are associated with preparing and consuming foods, including museums, food markets, and restaurants. We will experience the culinary walking tours and coffee tours for which Costa Rica is famous. We will become familiar with the health benefits of a Latin American diet. While in Costa Rica, we will do as the locals do – explore local dishes, as well as a vibrant mix of international cuisines.


Required Texts

TBA

 

 

 

Class Number:

Class Title:

 

SPAN 1001

Basic Spanish I

 

Class Instructor: TBA

Class Description: 3 cr.


CATALOG DESCRIPTION
                                              
Offered each semester. A sequence of courses developing all four language skills: speaking, understanding, writing, and reading. The course includes the presentation and discussion of cultural material such as magazines, films, records, and other audio-visual items when feasible.

BOOKS
Con Brio : Beginning Spanish

Author: 
Lucas Murillo, Maria C.,  Dawson, Laila M.
Edition: 3
Pub Date: 2012
Publisher: Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, John
ISBN-13: 9781118130629, ISBN: 1118130626

 

 

Class Number:

Class Title:

 

SPAN 1002

Basic Spanish II

 

Class Instructor: TBA

Class Description: 3 cr.

 

CATALOG DESCRIPTION
Prerequisite: SPAN 1001. A continuation of SPAN 1001.

BOOKS
Con Brio : Beginning Spanish

Author: 
Lucas Murillo, Maria C.,  Dawson, Laila M.
Edition: 3
Pub Date: 2012
Publisher: Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, John
ISBN-13: 9781118130629, ISBN: 1118130626


 

Class Number:

Class Title:

 

SPAN 2001

Intermediate Spanish I

 

Class Instructor: TBA

Class Description: 3 cr.

 

CATALOG DESCRIPTION
 Prerequisite: SPAN 1002. Continuation of the development of all four language skills: speaking, understanding, writing, and reading. The course includes the presentation and discussion of cultural material such as magazines, films, records, and other audio-visual items when feasible.

BOOKS
Con Brio : Beginning Spanish

Author: 
Lucas Murillo, Maria C.,  Dawson, Laila M.
Edition: 3
Pub Date: 2012
Publisher: Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, John
ISBN-13: 9781118130629, ISBN: 1118130626


 

Class Number:

Class Title:

 

SPAN 2002

Intermediate Spanish II

 

Class Instructor: TBA

Class Description: 3 cr.

CATALOG DESCRIPTION       
Prerequisite: SPAN 2001. Readings and exercises in Spanish. Special emphasis on comprehension as well as oral and written expression in the language.




Class Number:

Class Title:

 

SPAN 3031

Spanish Conversation

 

Class Instructor: TBA

Class Description: 3 cr.

CATALOG DESCRIPTION
Prerequisite: SPAN 2002. Conversation, oral discussions, interpretations and reports, practicing the spoken language. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. Native speakers majoring in Spanish must substitute three hours at the 3000 level or above.

 

 

Class Number:

Class Title:

 

SPAN 3191, 92, 93

Independent Work

 

Class Instructor: TBA

Class Description: 3 cr.

CATALOG DESCRIPTION                 
Readings, conferences, and papers under the direction of a member of the faculty. The course allows the student to correlate and supplement the work covered in the departmental courses. Each course may be repeated but combined credit may not exceed six semester hours.

No book required, a packet will be required (about $20-25)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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