We hope to see you in Costa Rica this summer!

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SUMMER 2018 COURSE OFFERINGS



Class Number: Class Title:
ANTH 3401 Folklore
ENGL 2090/4391 Special Topics in Literature: Magical Realist Fiction in Latin American Literature
ENGL 2090 Special Topics in Literature: Contemporary Travel Writing in Latin America
GEOG 2151 Elements of Physical Geography
SPAN 1001 Basic Spanish I
SPAN 1002 Basic Spanish II
SPAN 2001 Intermediate Spanish I
SPAN 2002 Intermediate Spanish II
SPAN 3031 Spanish Conversation
SPAN 3191,92,93 Independent Work

Course Descriptions


Class Number:

Class Title:

 

ANTH 3401

Folklore

 

Class Instructor: Dr. Juana Ibanez

Class Description: 3 cr

CATALOG DESCRIPTION  

A survey of traditional tales and oral literature, both in preliterate and peasant communities and in industrialized societies; the role of folk customs in modern culture.

PROFESSOR’S ADDENDUM –: Do you remember being told stories when you were little? How about all those jingles that you can still recite by memory? For instance, story of The Three Bears? Jack and the Beanstalk? and Simple Simon (who met a pie man going to the fair)? These stories are considered folklore. Folklore consists of the oral stories that have been passed down for generations. They make a lot of sense when you know about the particular social contexts from which the tales emerged. Folklore teaches people what acceptable behavior is and validates society’s rules and traditions. We’re going to be in Costa Rica, a country that still has some peasant communities and is rich in its oral traditions. After learning a bit about the origin, form, function and transmission of folklore from around the world we’re going to take a look at Latin American and Costa Rican folklore. Costa Rica is full of wonderful folktales centered around witches, birds and other critters, princes, and even Brer Rabbit ! We’ll use our exposure to Costa Rica to practice recognizing how folklore fits into today’s world. The grade for this class will be based on participation, two open book tests, and the field notebook/blog.

The class lectures will draw in cultural influences in Costa Rica and walking field trips. Cultural ecology -- the study of the interrelationship between the people and the environment -- will provide the theoretical framework within which we discuss the various manifestations of folklore.


Required Texts

Macha of Chira by Ethelyn Orso. Paperback, ISBN: 0-9630475-0-7 (provided by instructor) and others posted in Moodle.

You will be keeping a Field Notebook (ie. journal) during your San Ramon, Costa Rica experience. This is to assist you with your contextural reflections of what might be folklore in Costa Rica this summer. I encourage you to consider starting a blog that you can share with friends and family. You can post pictures there, too. You may use facebook if you prefer that type of interactive social media, too.

 

Class Number:

Class Title:

 
ENGL 2090/4391 Special Topics in Literature: Magical Realist Fiction in Latin American Literature  

Class Instructor: Dr. Lisa Verner

Class Description: 3 cr.

CATALOG DESCRIPTION                 
Whereas Magical Realism embraces many artistic forms, including painting and film, we most often associate the literary variety with Central and South America. As a movement, Magical Realism is broadly defined as occurring when magical and unrealistic elements invade an otherwise realistic and rational literary world and are accepted as unexceptional components of the narrative. The magical or fabulous elements of the literature are meant to represent the deeper truths of the characters, themes, and plots. This course will offer students a survey of Magical Realist Fiction in representative stories, novellas and novels from Central and South American authors. The course will require two papers and a final exam, each of which will constitute 30% of the student’s grade; class participation will make up the remaining 10% of the grade.

Required Texts

Jorge Luis Borges, “The Aleph” & “The South”

Octavio Paz, “My Life with the Wave”

Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Innocent Erendira and Other Stories

Carlos Fuentes, Aura

Laura Esquivel, Like Water for Chocolate

 

Class Number:

Class Title:

 

ENGL 2090

Special Topics in Literature: Contemporary Travel Writing in Latin America

 

Class Instructor: Dr. Lisa Verner

Class Description: 3 cr.

CATALOG DESCRIPTION  
This course will explore the joys, pitfalls, and insights of travel through a study of contemporary travel writing about Latin America. We will consider the challenges of rendering one’s experience of travel, complete with its discoveries and aggravation, into entertaining and expressive prose through an examination and critique of an assortment of 20th/21st century travel writers. We will discuss the impact of history, politics and gender on the authors’ narratives, and we will pay particular attention to the accusations of exoticism and stereotyping often leveled at first-world authors who write about developing nations. We will be careful to remain alert to the influence of ideology, both that of the authors and our own, on the literature of travel and our reactions to that literature. The course will require two papers and a final exam, each of which will constitute 30% of the student’s grade; class participation will make up the remaining 10% of the grade.

Required Texts

Mary Morris, Nothing to Declare

Tim Cahill, excerpts from Hold the Enlightenment, Pass the Butterworms, Pecked to Death by Ducks, and A Wolverine Is Eating My Leg

Excerpts from Outside Magazine’s Points Unknown: The Greatest Adventure Writing of the Twentieth Century

P.J. O’Rourke, “The Innocents Abroad, Updated,” “Panama Banal,” “Christmas in El Salvador,” and “Thirty-Six Hours in Managua—An In-depth Report” from Holidays in Hell

Jan Morris, “Confusions in Paradise: The Caribbean” from The World: Life and Travel 1950-2000


 

 

 

Class Number:

Class Title:

 

GEOG 2151

Elements of Physical Geography

 

Class Instructor: Dr. Juana Ibanez

Class Description: 3 cr

CATALOG DESCRIPTION

An examination of the fundamentals of the natural landscape and their interactions. Includes weather and climate processes, world climate patterns, soil and vegetation types, and landforming processes.

PROFESSOR’S ADDENDUM –Additional Information: Physical geography is the study of the spatial aspects of the Earth’s systems – landforms, climate, water, flora, etc. When was the last time you lived in the mountains, swam in both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, kicked back in hot springs or visited active volcanoes? Did you know that the topics isn’t just rain forest but has tropical savannas and cloud forests, too? Costa Rica is a live setting for many of the physical geographical elements of the world you are hearing about in class. Because Costa Rica is so different from New Orleans, and you are going to be exploring Costa Rica with various field trips, taking this course in a new environment makes it easier for you to compare and contrast your knowledge of the physical world to learn more about the spatial relationships of the Earth’s systems.


Required Texts

You will be keeping a Field Notebook (ie. journal) during your San Ramon, Costa Rica experience. This is to assist you with your contextural reflections of what might be folklore in Costa Rica this summer. I encourage you to consider starting a blog that you can share with friends and family. You can post pictures there, too. You may use facebook if you prefer that type of interactive social media, too.

 

 

 

Class Number:

Class Title:

 

SPAN 1001

Basic Spanish I

 

Class Instructor: TBA

Class Description: 3 cr.


CATALOG DESCRIPTION
                                              
Offered each semester. A sequence of courses developing all four language skills: speaking, understanding, writing, and reading. The course includes the presentation and discussion of cultural material such as magazines, films, records, and other audio-visual items when feasible.

BOOKS
Con Brio : Beginning Spanish

Author: 
Lucas Murillo, Maria C.,  Dawson, Laila M.
Edition: 3
Pub Date: 2012
Publisher: Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, John
ISBN-13: 9781118130629, ISBN: 1118130626

 

 

Class Number:

Class Title:

 

SPAN 1002

Basic Spanish II

 

Class Instructor: TBA

Class Description: 3 cr.

 

CATALOG DESCRIPTION
Prerequisite: SPAN 1001. A continuation of SPAN 1001.

BOOKS
Con Brio : Beginning Spanish

Author: 
Lucas Murillo, Maria C.,  Dawson, Laila M.
Edition: 3
Pub Date: 2012
Publisher: Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, John
ISBN-13: 9781118130629, ISBN: 1118130626


 

Class Number:

Class Title:

 

SPAN 2001

Intermediate Spanish I

 

Class Instructor: TBA

Class Description: 3 cr.

 

CATALOG DESCRIPTION
 Prerequisite: SPAN 1002. Continuation of the development of all four language skills: speaking, understanding, writing, and reading. The course includes the presentation and discussion of cultural material such as magazines, films, records, and other audio-visual items when feasible.

BOOKS
Con Brio : Beginning Spanish

Author: 
Lucas Murillo, Maria C.,  Dawson, Laila M.
Edition: 3
Pub Date: 2012
Publisher: Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, John
ISBN-13: 9781118130629, ISBN: 1118130626


 

Class Number:

Class Title:

 

SPAN 2002

Intermediate Spanish II

 

Class Instructor: TBA

Class Description: 3 cr.

CATALOG DESCRIPTION       
Prerequisite: SPAN 2001. Readings and exercises in Spanish. Special emphasis on comprehension as well as oral and written expression in the language.




Class Number:

Class Title:

 

SPAN 3031

Spanish Conversation

 

Class Instructor: TBA

Class Description: 3 cr.

CATALOG DESCRIPTION
Prerequisite: SPAN 2002. Conversation, oral discussions, interpretations and reports, practicing the spoken language. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. Native speakers majoring in Spanish must substitute three hours at the 3000 level or above.

 

 

Class Number:

Class Title:

 

SPAN 3191, 92, 93

Independent Work

 

Class Instructor: TBA

Class Description: 3 cr.

CATALOG DESCRIPTION                 
Readings, conferences, and papers under the direction of a member of the faculty. The course allows the student to correlate and supplement the work covered in the departmental courses. Each course may be repeated but combined credit may not exceed six semester hours.

No book required, a packet will be required (about $20-25)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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