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SUMMER 2014 COURSE OFFERINGS

Class Number: Class Title:
ANTH 3090 French Culture and Civilization
ANTH 3750 Food and Culture
FREN 1001 Basic French I
FREN 1002 Basic French II
FREN 2001 Intermediate French I
FREN 2002 Intermediate French II
FREN 3031 French Conversation
FREN 3090 Advanced Practical French
FREN 3205 Readings in French Culture and Thought
FREN 3403 Special Topics in French Civilization: Tales from the South
HIST 2991/4991 French Culture in Film
HIST 4330 The French Revolution and Napoleon

The Glories of France 2014

Course Descriptions

ANTH 3090

French Culture and Civilization

Class Instructor: David Beriss


France is a place and a nation, but it is also the center of many European mythologies. French civilization is known around the world for art, film and cuisine. France's once mighty empire carried its culture to the farthest corners of the planet, making "high culture" synonymous with "French culture" from Louisiana to Quebec and from West Africa to South-East Asia. Many historians argue that ideas such as human rights and the modern nation state originate in France. Perhaps we are all, at some level, participants in French culture.

This class will explore real country beyond these myths. Can we escape our own received ideas to understand the lives of French people? In this class we use some of France's own national obsessions and myths to see what they say about the real France. Of course, something like France will be all around us in Paris and Montpellier and we will strive to take full advantage of our location. Why, for instance, do the French persist in thinking of themselves as a nation of peasants? Why is immigration an object of fear and loathing for so many French people when France has long been a country formed by immigration? In a country obsessed with its past, how do French people come to terms with the self-inflicted wounds of the Second World War and decolonization? Can France remain a world power - in cultural, if not political and economic terms - in an era dominated by McDonald's, Coca-Cola and Mickey Mouse?

 

ANTH 3750

Food and Culture

Class Instructor: David Beriss

Class Description:


When it comes to food, it sometimes seems like we live in a world of endless plenty. In North America and Europe, at least, the supermarkets are nearly always full, displaying thousands of items, from fruits and vegetables, to carefully packaged meats, breads, dairy and an endless variety of snacks, meals, and beverages. As a result of globalization and modern transportation, we are no longer bound by seasons, so we can eat whatever we desire, whenever we desire it. Yet in the middle of this cornucopia, we worry. Americans (and Europeans too) are increasingly obese, bringing on a series of health consequences previously uncommon in human history. We are unsure of the sustainability of our food system and wonder if we can continue to produce and distribute food with little or no regard for seasons or regions. We worry about the consequences of sharp inequalities in food access within our own societies and between our societies and others.

This course will bring an anthropological perspective to the study of our contemporary food system. We will begin by asking why people eat what they eat. Not everyone agrees on what food is, so our first task will be to try and understand how people figure that out. We will examine how the definition of food, along with the ways in which it is produced and distributed, shapes and is shaped by society and culture. Food, we will see, plays a central role in the organization of kinship, relations between social classes, the practice of politics, and the shape of religious life. We will examine the relationship between changing systems of food production and distribution and the structure of societies. We will raise questions about how our food system participates in globalization, from questions of inequality, to cultural homogenization, potential loss, and creativity. We will use the resources available to us in Montpellier—farmers markets, wine makers, cheese producers, artisanal chocolate makers, Slow Food advocates, and local scholars—to explore what distinguishes French food thinking and practices from those in the United States.

 

FREN 1001

Basic French I

Class Instructor: TBA

Class Description:


CATALOG DESCRIPTION – Offered each semester. The first in a sequence of courses developing all four language skills: speaking, understanding, writing and reading. Audio-visual items will be used to enhance the process of language acquisition.

PROFESSOR'S ADDENDUM – The first in a sequence of courses developing all four language skills: speaking, understanding, writing and reading. Audio-visual items will be used to enhance the process of language acquisition.

Required book (s):
En Avant
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Humanities/Social Sciences/Languages; 1 edition (January 12, 2011)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0073535435
ISBN-13: 978-0073535432


 

FREN 1002

Basic French II

Class Instructor: TBA

Class Description:


CATALOG DESCRIPTION – Offered each semester. Prerequisite: FREN 1001 or consent of department. A continuation of FREN 1001.

PROFESSOR'S ADDENDUM – Prerequisite: FREN 1001 or consent of department. A continuation of FREN 1001.

Required book (s):
En Avant
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Humanities/Social Sciences/Languages; 1 edition (January 12, 2011)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0073535435
ISBN-13: 978-0073535432

 

FREN 2001

Intermediate French I

Class Instructor: TBA

Class Description:

CATALOG DESCRIPTION – Offered each semester. Prerequisite: FREN 1002 or consent of department. Continuation of the development of all four language skills: speaking, understanding, writing, and reading with special emphasis on the last skill. Audio-visual items will be used to enhance the process of language acquisition.

PROFESSOR'S ADDENDUM – Prerequisite: FREN 1002 or consent of department. Continuation of the development of all four language skills: speaking, understanding, writing, and reading with special emphasis on the last skill.

Required book (s):
En Avant
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Humanities/Social Sciences/Languages; 1 edition (January 12, 2011)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0073535435
ISBN-13: 978-0073535432

 

FREN 2002

Intermediate French II

Class Instructor: TBA

Class Description:


CATALOG DESCRIPTION – Offered each semester. Prerequisite: FREN 2001 or consent of department. Readings and exercises in French. Increased emphasis on the development of advanced reading and translation skills.

PROFESSOR'S ADDENDUM – Prerequisite: FREN 2001 or consent of department. Readings and exercises in French. Emphasis on the development of advanced reading and translation skills.

Required book (s):
En Avant
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Humanities/Social Sciences/Languages; 1 edition (January 12, 2011)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0073535435
ISBN-13: 978-0073535432

 

 

FREN 3031

French Conversation

Class Instructor: TBA

Class Description:


CATALOG DESCRIPTION – Prerequisite: FREN 2002 or consent of department. Conversation, oral discussions, interpretations, and reports; practice of the spoken language.

PROFESSOR'S ADDENDUM – Prerequisite: FREN 2002 or consent of department. Conversation, interpretations and reports for practicing the spoken language. This course will give students of the language the opportunity to improve their oral proficiency in French.

Required book (s): TBA

 

FREN 3090

Advanced Practical French

Class Instructor: Dennis Augier

Class Description:


CATALOG DESCRIPTION – Prerequisite: completion of 12 hours of beginning and intermediate level of the four-skills French sequence FREN 1001, 1002, 2001, 2002, or equivalent credit. Intensive instruction in the French language taught in France or in a French-speaking country and open only to students in the UNO-Montpellier Summer School or similar programs. Particular emphasis is placed on oral proficiency, socio-linguistic competence, and cultural awareness.

PROFESSOR'S ADDENDUM – This course offers intensive instruction in the French language, through the use of Montpellier itself as the textbook. Students will read and discuss a pre-prepared packet of cultural readings and will complete a series of practical tasks in the city, (such as getting information at the tourist bureau, going to the grocery, buying public transportation tickets, and interviewing people). Students will also complete brief assignments during excursions outside the city. Particular emphasis will be placed on oral proficiency, socio-linguistic competence, and cultural awareness. The class will be conducted in French.

Required book (s): TBA

 

FREN 3205

Readings in French Culture and Thought

Class Instructor: Dennis Augier

Class Description:


CATALOG DESCRIPTION – An overview of French intellectual, cultural and artistic history from the Middle Ages to 1800.  We will study the evolution of French society throughout this period, encounter key characters (Charlemagne, Henri IV, Louis XIV, Napoléon), and discuss artistic movements (Baroque, clacissisme, rococo, romantisme).
         
There will be 4 short written assignments, a mid-term and a final exam.
Readings will be in French.
 
Required text:
Steele and St. Onge. La Civilisation française en evolution. Vol. I (only) Thomson and Heinle. Latest Edition.

 

FREN 3403

Special Topics in French Civilization: Tales from the South

Class Instructor: Dennis Augier

Class Description:


Europe is not a place. It is a problem shrouded in myth and ideology. Until recently, many scholars took European societies to be the measure of all civilization. Others now argue that much of what we thought was European could be traced to Africa. Caught between old customs and grand empires, young nations and invented traditions, Europeans themselves wonder if there is such a thing as European culture. Europeans themselves are not sure of who they are anymore. The end of the cold war left the West without a well-defined East and globalization brought millions of former colonial citizens to live and work in what used to be western Europe. Supranational organizations, such as the European Union, are dissolving European national identities and challenging carefully built welfare states. From Disney to Google, American cultural and economic domination challenges the possibility that European countries might retain unique cultures and independent economies.

What remains of European cultures? In this course, we will draw on anthropological research in Europe to examine the ways in which European societies have managed to preserve much that is unique even as they adapt to new circumstances. Our readings will range across the continent, from the search for the authentic in Greece to the magic of Irish priests. We will also search for the essence of Europe and its culture(s) here in Montpellier. Are we in Euroland? France? Languedoc? From artisanal chocolates to modern electronics and from peasant traditions to international tourism, we will try to find the cultural contours of the new Europe.

 

HIST 2991/4991

The Development of Western Cinema

Class Instructor: Mark Kuss

Class Description:

CATALOG DESCRIPTION: HIST 2991/4991 Special Topics in History. 3 cr. Prerequisite: consent of department. Topic may vary from semester to semester. The course may be repeated once for credit.

PROFESSOR'S ADDENDUM – Topic for the Glories of France 2014-The Development of Western Cinema-A Historian's Perspective-French Culture in Film. What is France? What is French Culture? How is French Culture represented in Film? These will be the central questions of this course. We will view and analyze French films centering on aspects of French Culture. The presentations will consist of classical and contemporary productions in order to discuss the changing nature of culture and social norms.

 

 

 

 

HIST 4330

The French Revolution and Napoleon

Class Instructor: Mark Kuss

Class Description:

La révolution française en France! What a fantastic location in which to study and immerse ourselves in this pivotal period in European history. Beginning with an analysis of the state of European and French affairs in the early 18th century, we will progress to the outbreak of revolution in 1789 and the spread of the ideas of liberty, equality and fraternity. The Paris weekend will be a living reflection of the revolution and Napoleonic periods as we visit important sites and discuss their relevance. Montpellier will be our laboratory for the study of the revolution in the south of France and Napoleon's policies. Pertinent field trips will be scheduled on site.

Required book:
Rafe Blaufarb-Napoleon-Symbol for an Age-Bedford-St. Martin's-2008-ISBN-0-312-43110-4

 

 

 

 

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