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The Glories of France 2019

Course Description
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ANTH 3750

Food and Culture in Europe

Class Instructor: David Beriss

Class Description:

CATALOG DESCRIPTION – Examination of human diet and nutrition from an evolutionary and ecological perspective. The sociocultural and biological dimensions of food practices. Topics include the social roles of food: why we eat what we eat and with whom. Also discussed are food taboos and beliefs, food getting and preparation, changing food habits, contemporary problems of food production and malnutrition, and the effect of cultural and environmental influences on nutrient intake.

PROFESSOR’S ADDENDUM- When it comes to food, it sometimes seems like we live in a world of endless plenty. In North America and Europe, at least, the supermarkets are nearly always full, displaying thousands of items, from fruits and vegetables, to carefully packaged meats, breads, dairy and an endless variety of snacks, meals, and beverages. As a result of globalization and modern transportation, we are no longer bound by seasons, so we can eat whatever we desire, whenever we desire it. Yet in the middle of this cornucopia, we worry. Americans (and Europeans too) are increasingly obese, bringing on a series of health consequences previously uncommon in human history. We are unsure of the sustainability of our food system and wonder if we can continue to produce and distribute food with little or no regard for seasons or regions. We worry about the consequences of sharp inequalities in food access within our own societies and between our societies and others.

This course will bring an anthropological perspective to the study of our contemporary food system. We will begin by asking why people eat what they eat. Not everyone agrees on what food is, so our first task will be to try and understand how people figure that out. We will examine how the definition of food, along with the ways in which it is produced and distributed, shapes and is shaped by society and culture. Food, we will see, plays a central role in the organization of kinship, relations between social classes, the practice of politics, and the shape of religious life. We will examine the relationship between changing systems of food production and distribution and the structure of societies. We will raise questions about how our food system participates in globalization, from questions of inequality, to cultural homogenization, potential loss, and creativity. We will use the resources available to us in Montpellier—farmer’s markets, wine makers, cheese producers, artisanal chocolate makers, Slow Food advocates, and local scholars—to explore what distinguishes French food thinking and practices from those in the United States.

Required book (s):

TBA

 

 

HUMS 4090

Special Topics in Humanities: Socio-Cultural Foundations in Education

Class Instructor: Elizabeth Jeffers

Class Description:

CATALOG DESCRIPTION – An examination of selected topics in the Humanities drawn from contemporary issues in fields including but not limited to the arts, culture, economics, and politics as they relate to the human condition. Lectures and/or discussions featuring local experts in the area of study. May be repeated for credit (total of 6 credit hours).

PROFESSOR’S ADDENDUM- This course explores interdisciplinary understandings of the cultural and social realities of education in a modern, urban, industrial, global society. From the perspectives of the humanities and social sciences, this course exposes students to the idea of education as a social phenomenon and leads students to concepts of sociology, socialization, cultural context of educational system, issues of and social stratification, social criticism of trends in modern education, and educational innovation and reforms. Key subjects of study will include the recent immigration crisis experienced in much of Europe (including France), assimilation, enculturation, cultural heritage, and the longstanding challenges of integrating displaced and marginalized communities into state-run schooling.

Course Format: This course is designed for students to develop critical social intelligence regarding society and the role of education. A final paper will engage students in a sociological analysis of a K12 school’s system experiencing immigration and demographic shifts form the US or Europe.

 

Required Text:

TBA

 

EDCI 4993

Global Education

Class Instructor: Elizabeth Jeffers

Class Description:

CATALOG DESCRIPTION – Prerequisite: consent of department. The content of the courses will be varied from semester to semester. These courses may be repeated but total credit may not exceed six semester hours in any degree program. Section number will correspond with credit to be earned. (Units: 1/3)

PROFESSOR’S ADDENDUM- This seminar is an examination of educational systems in different countries, ideological and theoretical underpinnings for educational systems, practical manifestations, and key issues--in global and comparative contexts. We shall consider education on the macro level (national, ideological, policy) and the micro (local, implementational, school/class/practical). The focus will be on consideration of major features of- and issues impacting- American education relative to education in other systems and countries.

COURSE FORMAT: Students will participate in critical analysis and discussions based on course readings. This course may also include visits to a diversity of higher education institutions. A hands-on research project that focuses a French educational system will be assigned.


Required Material (s):

TBA

 

FREN 1001

Basic French I

Class Instructor: Pascal Jacob

Class Description:


CATALOG DESCRIPTION – The first in a sequence of courses developing all four language skills: speaking, understanding, writing and reading. Audio-visual items will be used to enhance the process of language acquisition.

PROFESSOR'S ADDENDUM -The first in a sequence of courses developing all four language skills: speaking, understanding, writing and reading. Audio-visual items will be used to enhance the process of language acquisition.

 

Required book (s):

Vis-à-vis: Beginning French (Student Edition) 6th edition by Evelyne Amon and Judith Muyskens and Alice C. Omaggio Hadley

  • ISBN 10: 0073386472

  • ISBN 13: 9780073386478

 



 

FREN 1002

Basic French II

Class Instructor: Pascal Jacob

Class Description:


CATALOG DESCRIPTION – Prerequisite: FREN 1001 or consent of department. A continuation of FREN 1001.

PROFESSOR'S ADDENDUM-Prerequisite: FREN 1001 or consent of department. A continuation of FREN 1001.

Required book (s):

Vis-à-vis: Beginning French (Student Edition) 6th edition by Evelyne Amon and Judith Muyskens and Alice C. Omaggio Hadley

  • ISBN 10: 0073386472

  • ISBN 13: 9780073386478



 

FREN 2001

Intermediate French I

Class Instructor: Pascal Jacob

Class Description:


CATALOG DESCRIPTION – Prerequisite: FREN 1002 or consent of department. Continuation of the development of all four language skills: speaking, understanding, writing, and reading with special emphasis on the last skill. Audio-visual items will be used to enhance the process of language acquisition.

PROFESSOR'S ADDENDUM - Prerequisite: FREN 1002 or consent of department. Continuation of the development of all four language skills: speaking, understanding, writing, and reading with special emphasis on the last skill.

Required book (s):

Vis-à-vis: Beginning French (Student Edition) 6th edition by Evelyne Amon and Judith Muyskens and Alice C. Omaggio Hadley

  • ISBN 10: 0073386472

  • ISBN 13: 9780073386478

 

FREN 2002

Intermediate French II

Class Instructor: Pascal Jacob

Class Description:


CATALOG DESCRIPTION – Prerequisite: FREN 2001 or consent of department. Readings and exercises in French. Increased emphasis on the development of advanced reading and translation skills.

PROFESSOR'S ADDENDUM- Prerequisite: FREN 2001 or consent of department. Readings and exercises in French. Emphasis on the development of advanced reading and translation skills.

Required book (s):

Vis-à-vis: Beginning French (Student Edition) 6th edition by Evelyne Amon and Judith Muyskens and Alice C. Omaggio Hadley

  • ISBN 10: 0073386472

  • ISBN 13: 9780073386478



 

 

 

 

HUMS 2090/4090

Studies in French Culture: American Remakes in French Film: A Cultural Analysis

Class Instructor: Brenda Dyer

Class Description:


CATALOG DESCRIPTION –
2090: Catalog Description: An examination of selected topics in the Humanities drawn from contemporary issues in fields including but not limited to the arts, culture, economics, and politics as they relate to the human condition. Lectures and/or discussions featuring local experts in the area of study. May be repeated for credit (total of 6 credit hours)

4090:Catalog Description: An examination of selected topics in the Humanities drawn from contemporary issues in fields including but not limited to the arts, culture, economics, and politics as they relate to the human condition. Lectures and/or discussions featuring local experts in the area of study. May be repeated for credit (total of 6 credit hours)

PROFESSOR’S ADDENDUM- Since the 1930’s Hollywood has remade more than 60 French films, adapting their stories to appeal to an American audience. Some of these films have remained quite faithful to the originals, whereas others have made significant changes, usually of a cultural nature. In this class we will watch and analyze several pairs of these films, using them as “cultural texts” to help us better understand the similarities and differences between French and American culture and identity. Students will also read articles and texts in French to aid in their cross-cultural analyses. Class discussions will include our notions of history, humor, family, friendship, religion, government and cultural values.

Required book (s):

TBA

 

HIST 4991

Special Studies in History: Restaging the Past in France

Class Instructor: Charles Chamberlain

Class Description:


CATALOG DESCRIPTION –
Topic may vary from semester to semester. The course may be repeated once for credit.

PROFESSOR’S ADDENDUM- The course provides an overview of France’s history, and uses walking tours and day trips to examine the restaging and presentation of France’s past. Montpellier includes significant Gallic and Roman historic sites, Medieval and Baroque architecture and monuments, as well as museums and historic churches that reveal the depth of France’s rich layered history. This course offers students a first-hand opportunity to analyze the preservation and presentation of these ancient historic sites and neighborhoods in Montpellier and nearby cities, and question how French national identity is shaped and challenged.

The class is a mix of classroom preparation and field trips that draw from the professor’s tour guiding experience and knowledge of the region. Walking tours focus on Montpellier’s core historic neighborhoods (quartiers), while possible day trips may include visits to the towns of Sete and Lattes (Site Archéologique Lattara), Nimes (Musée de la Romanité), Arles, and Avignon. Museum visits may include Musée de Languedocien, Musée de Vieux Montpellier. Church visits include the Montpellier Cathedral, Notre Dame des Tables de Montpellier, Eglise Saint-Roch, and Eglise Sainte-Anne.

Required book (s):

TBA

 

 

HIST 2991

Special Studies in History: France and the Mediterranean World

Class Instructor: Charles Chamberlain

Class Description:


CATALOG DESCRIPTION- Topic may vary from semester to semester. The course may be repeated for credit.

PROFESSOR’S ADDENDUM- This course examines France’s historic relationship with the larger Mediterranean world. Montpelier’s location offers a firsthand opportunity to experience the South of France’s rich Mediterranean history and culture, while the class examines the legacy of both historic and modern colonialism as well as immigration and assimilation today. In-class lectures provide content and preparation, but the learning experience emphasizes walking tours and day trips to local ancient historic sites and museums, local neighborhoods and North African markets, and the nearby historic Mediterranean seaport of Sete.

The class is a mix of in-class preparation and short field trips drawing on the professor’s experience and knowledge of the region. Walking tours visit nearby neighborhoods, historic sites, museums, churches, while street markets, musical and cultural events are also available. Museum visits may include Musée de Languedocien, Musée de Vieux Montpellier, Musées Fabre and Atger, Site Archéologique Lattara (Lattes), and la Musée de la Romanité (Nimes), Fiesta de Sete (mid-July) and the Festival du Thau in Meze (mid-July) present well respected Mediterranean musical artists.


Required book (s):

TBA

 

 

 

ENGL 2238

Reading Fiction

Class Instructor: Anne Rioux

Class Description:


CATALOG DESCRIPTION- Offered each semester. A general introduction to the study and appreciation of fiction.

PROFESSOR’S ADDENDUM- This course will explore the genre of the short story with a focus on stories set in France. We will read stories by French writers such as Guy de Maupassant, Gustav Flaubert, Honoré de Balzac, Emile Zola, Alphonse Daudet, Colette, Simone de Beauvoir, Albert Camus, and others. And we will read stories by Americans such as Henry James, Edith Wharton, Constance Fenimore Woolson, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, James Baldwin, and Kay Boyle. Students will get to explore French history and culture through these stories while also learning to appreciate the short story as a distinct art form. Students will also examine the history of the short story, from its origins in European (and particularly French) culture through its modern and contemporary iterations, as well as the rich history of American expatriate literature. This will allow students to compare and contrast how writers approach France from both the inside and the outside and give students new perspectives on their own French experiences. Students will also learn to analyze short fiction through its elements, such as setting, style, characterization, point of view, symbol, and theme, as well as develop their critical thinking and writing skills through class discussion and expository essays. Assignments will include two short papers, a midterm, and a final.

 

Required book (s):

TBA

 

 

 

 

ENGL 2090

Special Studies in Language and Literature (The Travel Writing of France and Italy)

Class Instructor: Anne Rioux

Class Description:


CATALOG DESCRIPTION – Reading, evaluation, and discussion of selected writers, works, or literary topics. May be taken twice for a maximum of six credit hours.

PROFESSOR'S ADDENDUM- In this class students will both read and write travel literature, a form of creative nonfiction, allowing students to better understand their experiences abroad through their engagements with the written word. At its core, travel writing places an individual in a foreign setting, illuminates the experience of being an outsider, and attempts to bridge the gap between the visitor and the so-called natives. Often these attempts generate as much understanding of the self as of the other, hence the genre’s close association with memoir. We will examine the history of travel to and writing about Europe, with a focus on France, but also dipping into writing about Italy. We will sample different modes of travel and the writings they inspire, including the 19th-century Grand Tour, literary tourism, art history tourism, culinary tourism, travel on foot, and travel by train. Students will read essays by Henry James, Edith Wharton, Frances Mayes, Peter Mayle, Terry Tempest Williams, Alice Steinbach, and others, and use their own journal writings about their travels as source material for their final essays. By the end of the course, students will be able to analyze travel writing as a distinct art form, recognize strategies writers use to bring their travels to life, and identify the recurring themes of outsiders’ encounters with Italy. Assignments will include a journal, class discussion, a midterm, and a final essay.

Required book (s):

TBA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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