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UNO ROME 2018

SUMMER 2018 COURSE OFFERINGS

Class Number Class Title
ENGL 2090 The Roman World In Literature and Film
ENGL 2090 Special Topics in Literature: Italian Travel Narratives
FA 1010 Art Appreciation
FA 1051 Digital Design
FA 1060 Intro to Drawing
MUS 1000 Music Appreciation
MUS 2001 Introduction to Music Composition

Summer 2018 Course Descriptions


Class Number:

Class Title:

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ENGL 2090

The Roman World in Literature and Film

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Class Instructor: Dr. Lisa Verner

Class Description:                       

 

Description.Recently--and not so recently--the viewing public has been bombarded with cinematic renderings of the classical world. Whereas films such as Gladiator set records at the box office, regrettably few viewers go to the trouble of familiarizing themselves with the rich store of literature that serves as inspiration for these blockbusters and to a large extent as the basis for the study of Western civilization itself. This course sets out to fill the gap between celluloid depictions of antiquity and the literary heritage of the Roman world. We will examine how contemporary film understands and presents the past, to what extent films based in antiquity are disconnected from the stories and historical issues that inspired them, and what connections might exist and how those connections might help us better understand both classical literature and modern film. In order to achieve these objectives, students will develop an understanding of Roman literature and culture, which will in turn serve as the basis for understanding how modern culture has re-visioned the ancient world. This will be accomplished through close reading of classical epic, history, and poetry with emphasis on historical context; study of select critical materials on the subject of antiquity in film; the viewing of modern cinematic re-visions; and class discussion of all these materials.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

Plautus. Three Comedies: "Miles Gloriosus," "Pseudolus," "Rudens." Trans. Peter L. Smith. Ithaca, New York: Cornell UP, 1991. ISBN 978-080149594.

From Marcus Aurelius, Meditations, on the MIT Classics website, available at: http://classics.mit.edu/Antoninus/meditations.html
From Appian, The Civil Wars, book one, section XIV:
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/Appian/Civil_Wars/1*.html

From Cassius Dio, Roman History, Epitome of Book 73 (on Commodus):
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/Cassius_Dio/73*.html

Chapters on Julius Caesar and Augustus from Suetonius’ The Twelve Caesars online at the University of Chicago’s Penelope website:
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/Suetonius/12Caesars/Julius*.html

FILMS: We will view the following films:
Gladiator
A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum
Rome (select episodes from the first season of the HBO series)

 


 

Class Number:

Class Title:

Class Section:

ENGL 2090

Special Topics in Literature: Italian Travel Narratives

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Class Instructor: Dr. Lisa Verner

Class Description:                       

Description.This course will explore the joys, pitfalls, and insights of travel through a survey of travel narratives about Italy. We will consider the challenges of rendering one’s experience of travel, complete with its discoveries and aggravation, into entertaining and expressive prose through an examination and critique of an assortment of travel narratives that take Italy as their subject. We will discuss the impact of history, politics and gender on the authors’ narratives, and we will pay particular attention to the tendency towards romanticism and stereotyping often indulged in by Anglo authors writing about Italy. In addition to written works, we will also consider two cinematic narratives, paying particular attention to the ways that visual texts influence perception of travel. The course will require two papers and a final exam, each of which will constitute 30% of the student’s grade; class participation will make up the remaining 10% of the grade.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

Anthony Doerr, Four Seasons in Rome
Tim Parks, Italian Ways: On and Off the Rails from Milan to Palermo [excerpts]
Jan Morris, Venice
Bill Bryson, Neither Here nor There: Travels in Europe [excerpts--chapters 13: Rome; 14: Naples, Sorrento & Capri; and 15: Florence]

Cinematic Texts:

A Room with a View, director James Ivory, 1985.
The Trip to Italy, director Michael Winterbottom, 2014.


 

 

 

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FA 1010

Art Appreciation

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Class Instructor:

Class Description:

Description.

An introduction to art in which the visual elements and principles are examined through a study of the key monuments in the history of art from cave paintings to the present. Important styles of painting, sculpture, architecture, and twentieth century media are explored with attention to the personalities of the artists and the cultures in which they lived.

As this class is in Rome, special attention will be made to Renaissance and Classical Roman art as well as contemporary Italian art. We will visit the major museums and galleries in Rome and Florence, seeing arguably the greatest works of art ever made.

Book: TBA

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FA 1051

Digital Design

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Class Instructor:

Class Description:

Description. The object of this class is to introduce you to the world of design using digital forms of creation. The class is about visual critical thinking and how it is you can come to make aesthetic decisions based on the material we go over in the class. The process of design is not about right or wrong, instead it has come to embody the relationship of FORM and FUNCTION. Consider the way you read a book and then apply that concept to an image. An image is as much about communication and reading. Why do you think the renaissance happened? During that time period art was all about communicating the greatness of god. There are many aspects of an image that can be investigated and dissected. Most importantly is that you can gain an understanding of the design process through the readings, lectures, critiques and art making that we will be doing in this class. We will explore what makes digital media unique in the realm of visual problem solving. While this is a studio course in which we will learn software and techniques, there will be a strong focus on the content of the digital art works created in class.
The second objective is to achieve a level of comfort with the tools and techniques needed to create two-dimensional digital artwork. In class we will use programs such as adobe photoshop and adobe illustrator, It is very important to remember that these are all just tools for making art. They don’t make the art for us.

Supplies:

TBA


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FA 1060

Intro to Drawing

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Class Instructor:

Class Description:

Description. Offered each semester. An introduction to basic drawing concepts and media. Six hours of studio work. Being in Rome would certainly be an opportunity to teach students the fundamentals of drawing in the midst of the art of the masters. Art students going back to the Renaissance have drawn figure studies from antiquity, studying anatomy from works of genius, which are both humbling and inspiring. Field trips for life drawing exercises and studio set up for drawing fundamentals will be used.

Supplies:

TBA


 

 


 

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MUS 1000

Music Appreciation

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Class Instructor: Dr. Yotam Haber

Class Description:

Description: An appreciation and analysis from the viewpoint of the listener of the representative works in Western art tradition, covering selected masterworks including Bach, Handel, Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, Brahms, Tchaikovsky, Bartok, Mahler, Stravinsky, and Schoenberg. This survey class is for any student and no previous knowledge of or about music is required.

Professor’s Addendum: This course is an overview of the history of Western Art Music. The course will consist of lectures, discussion, video & listening examples, reading assignments, and attendance at live musical events throughout Rome. Guest lectures and concerts will include professors from the Accademia Nazionale Santa Cecilia Conservatory and the Auditorium Parco della Musica, the premier arts centre of Italy. Students will learn the basic elements of music and
acquire knowledge of the periods of music history, including major composers, styles, and selected works. Special emphasis will be placed on the music of Italy, and in particular, Rome, from the Renaissance works of Palestrina, the operas of Rossini, Bellini, and Verdi, to the 20th and 21st century works of Respighi, Luciano Berio, Franco Donatoni, and Salvatore Sciarrino. No music background
necessary. Fieldwork will include attending concerts, masterclasses, and operas in Rome.

We will also explore some aspects of music composition (no formal training is required!). In Italy, we will be exploring the city on foot, buses, and trains, from a sonic perspective through fieldwork, recording, and listening. Your laptop and free audio software will be used as tools to sonically access
your creativity. Your final project will be a composition that will be performed at the end of the course.

Text:TBA


 

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MUS 2001

Introduction to Music Composition

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Class Instructor: Dr. Yotam Haber

Class Description:

Description: Description: Through a progressive series of projects, students explore the sonic organization of music, focusing on fundamental ideas of organization, drama, logic, rhetoric, and variety. We will investigate notational issues whether these instructions are notated in prose, as graphic images, or in
symbolic notation. No formal training is required. Daily listening, reading, and composition assignments draw on a broad range of musical styles and intellectual traditions, from various cultures and historical periods.

Professor’s Addendum:
Music making is a crucial means for human expression, taking on countless forms in different times and places. This course is concerned with improving access to musical creativity, by providing and enhancing tools and techniques. The focus of written assignments will be to develop musical ideas and notation methods that effectively transmit them to performers. The computer and certain free
audio software will be used as tools to explore these and related issues. This is the class for you if you want to be creative with sound and performance. The final project will be a composition that will be performed at the end of the course. In Italy, we will be exploring the city from a sonic perspective through fieldwork, recording, and
listening. We will also visit the studios of Roman composers to see how they work, and hear several contemporary music concerts at the Accademia Nazionale Santa Cecilia, the Auditorium Parco della Musica, the Rome Opera, and other venues.

Text:TBA


 

 

 

 

 

 

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