UNO Ireland: Writing Workshops & Creative Arts

June 20 - July 22, 2017

 

2017 Applications are now being accepted.

 

 

All courses listed at 4000/5000 level may be taken by
both undergraduate and graduate level students.

Proposed Courses

Course Number

Course Title

Faculty

Syllabus

Open Seats

 

Section I

Morning Session: 9:30-11:45 MTWR

ENGL 6171 Intensive Fiction Writing Fredrick Barton  
ENGL 4161/5161 Advanced Fiction Writing Elizabeth Collison  
ENGL 2160 Introduction to Creative Writing Elizabeth Collison
FTA 6207/6257
Intensive Script Writing James Winter
Cavan Hallman
FTA 4200/4251 Advanced Scriptwriting James Winter
Cavan Hallman
 
 

Section II

Afternoon Session: 1:00-3:15 MTWR

ENGL 6174 Intensive Nonfiction Writing Sonja Livingston
Kaethe Schwehn
 
ENGL 4154 Advanced Nonfiction Writing Sonja Livingston
Kaethe Schwehn
 
ENGL 2090 Irish Ghost Stories Robin Werner
FTA 4330/5330 Acting Styles
 

Section III

Evening Session: 3:30-6:15 MWR

ENGL 4380/5380 Irish Literature & Culture
Mary Breen  
ENGL 4391.1/ 5391.1 Sexuality in Fiction Elizabeth Steeby  
FTA 4591/5591 Ireland in Cinema Laura Medina  
 

Section IV

Independent Study

ENGL 4392
FTA 3090
Directed Study/Internship Varied    
Directed Study/Internship Varied  
Thesis Research Varied  

 

The basic cost of the program includes tuition for six credit hours (two classes). Students may enroll in up to nine credit hours, or one class in each session, for an additional fee. When completing your online application, please select your first and second choice in each relevant section, keeping in mind that you cannot enroll in two classes that meet at the same time.

 

For information on our non-credit Cork Writers' Retreat, available to post-graduates and other non-degree seeking students please click here.

 

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ENGL 6171
Intensive Fiction Writing

A workshop in graduate fiction writing, taught in an intensive (short term) format, in residence. Intensive Fiction Writing is intended to assist aspiring writers to become better and more instinctive at their craft. Close attention is given to the structure and language that propel plots and make characters come alive. Students should have extensive prior experience in creative writing, or receive the written consent of the instructor. The course consists of four primary activities:

1. Writing stories (three per student)
2. Reading and discussing stories
3. Critiquing and annotating your classmates' work
4. Attending and participating in student readings.


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ENGL 4161/5161
Advanced Fiction Writing

A workshop in advanced fiction writing, taught in an intensive (short term) format, in residence. Advanced Fiction Writing is intended to assist aspiring writers to become better and more instinctive at their craft. Close attention is given to the structure and language that propel plots and make characters come alive. Students should have prior experience in creative writing, or receive the written consent of the instructor. The course consists of four primary activities:

1. Writing stories (three per student)
2. Reading and discussing stories
3. Critiquing and annotating your classmates' work
4. Attending and participating in student readings

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ENGL 2160
Introduction to Creative Writing

This course provides students the opportunity to receive constructive feedback on their creative writing and participate in the critiques of peer work. Workshops of student writing, as well as discussions of the assigned reading, will help beginners create and revise poems, fiction, and creative non-fiction.

We will focus on particular elements of creative writing that are essential to writing in any genre, including character, plot, conflict, description, detail, dialogue, imagery, tension, lyricism, rhythm, and others. We will learn to navigate and read the world as writers and to understand that everything around us has the capacity to inspire creative work.

This course will be primarily a writing course. We will also read various examples of canonical and contemporary prose and poetry in order to discuss craft and technique as well as develop a literary vocabulary to facilitate our discussion. We will use writing exercises to prompt in-class and out-of-class writing. By the end of the semester, each student will have produced:

1. Three creative works in at least two genres
2. Informal and in-class writing in all three genres
3. Written feedback for the submitted work of all their classmates
4. A presentation on a work, author, or element of literature

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FTA 6207/6257
Intensive Scriptwriting

Studies and practice in writing scripts for the stage and film, taught in an intensive (short term) format in residence. Students should have prior experience with script writing, or receive the written consent of the instructor.

This course is designed to enhance the student's basic knowledge of the process of writing and developing a script for the stage or the screen, and to demonstrate and develop techniques for writing works intended for performance. Students should improve their knowledge of the collaborative process when developing work for the stage and screen and of taking a performance piece from concept to produced script.

Prior to the first class meeting in Cork, each student must submit a clean first/initial draft ready for reading and discussion. If you are generating a piece over the course of the workshop, an initial partial draft coupled with a thorough outline must be submitted. You will be expected to thoroughly discuss each of your classmates’ submitted assignments in class. You will also be expected to work directly with the actors and any other theatre artists contributing their time to the development of your pieces. All comments, interactions and responses are expected to be thorough and constructive.

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FTA 4200/4251
Advanced Scriptwriting

An advanced undergraduate course in the study and practice of writing original scripts for the stage or screen, taught in an intensive (short term) format, in residence.  Students should have some prior experience with script writing or the creative writing workshop format, or receive the written consent of the instructor.

This month-long writing intensive challenges students to work on multiple fronts simultaneously: revise, research, develop and write.  It is designed to enhance the student’s basic knowledge of the process of writing and developing a script for the stage or screen, and to demonstrate and develop techniques for writing works intended for performance.  Students should improve their knowledge of the collaborative process when developing work for the stage and screen and of taking a performance piece from concept to produced script.

By the end of the summer term, students in this course will be able to: Further enhance the scriptwriting process as an advancement of previous work; explore and develop the basic skill sets needed for writing and developing a script for the stage or the screen; demonstrate and develop techniques for writing works intended for performance; understand how to take a performance piece from concept to produced script; implement the collaborative process as it pertains to developing work for the stage and screen.

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JOUR 4700/5700
Advanced Journalism

Through a combination of class discussion and real life assignments, students will learn the history and mechanics of the news-gathering profession while understanding its guiding principles. Americans are consuming more news than ever before, yet the trajectory of trust and confidence in the press has been trending downward. In this class, a veteran journalist and author teaches the foundational techniques of the profession while probing the reasons for its decline. 

Technological advances have transformed how we get our news, and the demands on reporters are changing with them. What has not changed is the fundamental skill set necessary for any journalist: thorough and accurate reporting, crisp and efficient writing, and an understanding of one’s responsibilities to colleagues and to an audience. In this class, students will become reporters themselves as they learn the differences between Objectivity and Fairness, Opinion and News, and Assigned and Enterprise reporting. Students will generate story ideas then  gather information on their subject through research and interviewing sources. Students will learn how to organize the information into a complete story and to evaluate the news value of their finished products.

By completing this course, students will understand the evolution of news-gathering, learn to think critically about current events and to report and write accurately and intelligently. Students also will learn how modern news organizations can avoid the pitfalls that have led to an erosion of public trust.

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ENGL 6174
Intensive Nonfiction Writing

A workshop in advanced nonfiction writing, taught in an intensive (short term) format, in residence. Creative nonfiction writing describes real events, places, and lives using the techniques of fiction (character, dialogue, POV, and scene) and the elements of poetry (attention to language, associative leaps, experimental form). Creative nonfiction writers combine two contexts--the world of fact, and the techniques of literature--to tell a true story packed with information, grace, power, and clarity. Though we write from reality, literary nonfiction writers must learn to shape, finesse, and deepen. The focus is learning to write our experiences in such a way that others will want to read them.

Each student submits three pieces for the workshop, as well as critically reads the work of others and sample essays, providing written feedback and promoting discussion in an environment that is respectful and dynamic. Students are also expected to attend and participate in the student readings.

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ENGL 4154
Advanced Nonfiction Writing

An advanced workshop in undergraduate nonfiction writing, taught in an intensive (short term) format, in residence.  Creative nonfiction focuses on writing real world experiences with personality and style.  In this workshop, you’ll write creative nonfiction and respond critically to the work of others.  The purpose of this course is fairly straightforward: to help you become a better writer of creative nonfiction.  Because we’ll be reading, discussing, and learning in Ireland, a country to which most of us are not native, I want to think together about what it means to be a citizen, to be an inhabitant of a particular place at a particular moment in time.  We’ll discuss the tools available to creative writers, regardless of genre, including language, dialogue, scene, structure and form, tense/POV, details, and sensory descriptions.  Insofar as the self is always a current (however large or small) in creative writing, we’ll talk and explore the idea of positioning the self within the wider scopes of history, society, and nation.  Because the work is taken from life, the challenge (and thrill) is to explore threads of memory, observation, and/or research that most intrigue you and mine them for their riches.  Success in the course is dependent both on your ability to engage your reader on the page and your ability to articulate how an essay functions (or could function better) in the work of your peers. 

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ENGL 4380/5380
Irish Literature & Culture

This intensive reading course emphasizes primary texts and their representation of Irish culture and landscape over the last one hundred years. We will read many of the major Irish works of fiction and nonfiction of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. We will also pay attention to the complex and innovative narrative techniques that the authors employed in the construction of their novels and autobiographies. The class will give a general introduction to all of the novels, their structures and central themes, and also the historical and cultural settings from which they emerge. Students will be graded on two papers (one short, one long) a class presentation, and a journal recording the student’s reflections on the excursions.

Required texts may include stories, novels, memoirs, and excerpts by James Joyce, Elizabeth Bowen, Edna O’Brien, Molly Keane, Samuel Beckett, Colm Toibin, Seamus Deane, and John McGahern.

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ENGL 4391.1/5391.1
Sexuality in Fiction

When I was sixteen I picked up a can of peas in a grocery store and could feel from the can that it had just been touched by a man who would love me better than anyone had ever loved me and I panicked.
                        --CA Conrad, “The Queer Voice”

This course will advance students’ understanding of sexuality studies and U.S. American, British, and Irish literature through analysis of multiethnic 20th and 21st-century novels and short stories. As much as possible, we will connect popular culture to literary narratives that represent lived and imagined sexualities, desires, and bodies that are dynamic and often unresolved. For example, how does literature challenge our preconceived notions that sexuality can be reduced to "gay"/ "straight", "normal"/ "perverse"? We will also read theoretical and analytical texts provide us with contexts and methodologies for understanding constructs of sexuality as they intersect with formations of race, gender, and class. Through the assigned literary works, we will approach sexualities as lived realities and as systems of meaning that change over time and vary with context.

POTENTIAL TEXTS: James Baldwin, Giovanni's Room; Eileen Myles, Chelsea Girls; Leslie Feinberg, Stone Butch Blues; Colm Tóibín, The Master; Jeanette Winterson, Orange Is Not the Only Fruit; Sarah Waters, Tipping the Velvet; Chris Kraus, I Love Dick; Louise Erdich, The Round House; Justin Torres, We the Animals; and short works by Edna O’Brien, Andrea Levy, Junot Diaz, Jessica Hagedorn, Kathy Acker, Audre Lorde, Mary Gaitskill, and others. 

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ENGL 2090
Irish Ghost Stories

Ghost stories are one of the most consistently popular genres and telling ghost stories has long been a quintessentially Irish tradition.  As I’ve found, teaching my popular courses on Vampires and Monsters, horror literature reveals much about the culture that produces it and makes for both fascinating class discussions and compelling student research projects.  This course will center in on the Irish tradition of the ghost story, encouraging students to consider these texts from both a cultural and a psychological perspective.  Students will read a wide variety of tales both ancient and modern including stories by authors like Patrick Kennedy, George Moore, Oscar Wilde, W. B. Yeats and Rosa Mulholland.  Since some of the most famous hauntings in Ireland are actually in County Cork, students might be interested in field trips to sites such as: Belvelly Castle (haunted by the vain, 17th century Lady Margaret), Cork District Lunatic Asylum (with its ghostly inmates), or Cork City Gaol (with its green shawled female prisoner).  All do regular night tours.

By the end of the semester, students will be able to effectively analyze the elements of the fiction genre and discuss the historic, cultural and psychological implications of these texts.  They will conduct independent research to produce thoughtful and insightful writing on the theme of the course.  The course will require two papers.  One shorter project (with a creative writing option) and one longer paper involving critical research.  The course will also test students in a final exam. 

Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Exhibit proficiency in Rhetorical Knowledge
  • Exhibit Proficiency in Critical thinking, Reading and Writing
  • Exhibit Proficient knowledge of Literary History of Ireland
  • Exhibit Proficiency in Critical Analysis of literary texts

Specifically, after successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Create effective oral and written arguments
    • Organize thoughts logically and coherently both orally and in writing
    • Demonstrate familiarity with the genre of Monster literature
    • Conduct Library Research effectively
    • Evaluate sources, incorporate ideas and texts of others, while avoiding plagiarism
    • Write persuasively and in depth on a topic of their own choosing

 

Required texts:

Irish Ghost Stories by David Stuart Davies ISBN-13: 978-1509826612
Additional readings may be assigned.

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FTA 4330/5330
Acting Styles

This course is designed to help everyone from the creative writer who has trouble with public speaking to the emerging playwrights and screenplay authors who have the rare opportunity to test-drive and develop new work with actual performers. After some basic ensemble and skill-building course work, students will workshop, rehearse and perform segments of original pieces being developed by the script-writing class. Topics to be considered:

1. Basic methods of warming up physically and vocally
2. Ensemble and focus work
3. Explorations in moment-to-moment reality
4. Script analysis from a performance vantage point
5. Addressing blocks to creative expression through performance
6. The collaborative process for writers and performers
7. Influence of early and “test” audience reactions on script development and performance

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FTA 4096.1/5096.1
Digital Storytelling

This course is designed to provide a workshop environment where students develop and complete a visual digital project. Students will acquire understanding and mastery of key concepts of storytelling, finding and recognizing good ideas for visual storytelling, and the visual interpretation and presentation of story through images. Class will consist of discussions, group exercises and field trips. Students would be required to provide and be able to operate their own media production equipment such as cell phone with digital camera or digital camera, as well as editing & presentation platforms (laptop, notebook, etc.) needed for their specific project.

 

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ENGL 4391.2/5391.2
Seminar in Self-Publishing

Many authors begin the process of putting their writing into the world as self-publishers, but most do so without experience, and without studying the routes others have taken to succeed. This course will examine past examples of successful self-publishing, and workshop toward successful self-publishing. It is expected that students enrolled in the course will bring with them a work of writing that they consider finished/edited. Students will workshop the work, and work with the class on laying-out and printing the work. Zines, chapbooks, and more conventional publishing formats are discussed, debated, and then chosen. Class ends with a publishing party.

Abram Shalom Himelstein self-published Tales of a Punk Rock Nothing as an act of desperation in 1998. After selling through the first edition on the street, Himelstein incorporated as a publisher, running New Mouth from the Dirty South, then cofounding the Neighborhood Story Project and now, working as editor in chief at UNO Press. The seminar will take students from edited manuscripts toward the publishing formats that feel organic to their own work.
Work submitted: Students will provide written critiques of each other’s work, and these critiques will count as half of the student’s grade. The other half of the grade is earned through the publication of the work.

Texts: Photocopies and internet readings will provide the lion’s share of readings. Instead of purchasing textbooks, students are expected to bear the cost of publishing their own work.

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ENGL 4391.3/5391.3
Irish Drama

Theatre has long been a defining genre for explorations of Irish Identity.  From the National Theatre to contemporary Irish drama, theatre has been a central genre in Irish literature.  Some of the finest playwrights of the last century have come from Ireland. This course will cover drama from the Fin-de-Siecle through Contemporary period by a diverse collection of playwrights like Lady Gregory, Yeats, Synge, Shaw, and Friel.  Students will have access to the lively theatre scene in Cork.  Readings will include theoretical approaches to theatre history and performance traditions.  A fieldtrip to see some live theatre would enhance the course.  If the Cork Midsummer festival overlaps with the program, that might make an interesting field trip, as well.

By the end of the semester, students will be able to effectively analyze the elements of the drama genre and discuss the cultural implications of these texts.  They will conduct independent research to produce thoughtful and insightful writing on the theme of the course.  The course will require two papers.  One shorter project (with a creative writing option) and one longer paper involving critical research.  The course will also test students in a final exam. 

Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Exhibit proficiency in Rhetorical Knowledge
  • Exhibit Proficiency in Critical thinking, Reading and Writing
  • Exhibit Proficient knowledge of Dramatic Literature genre in Ireland
  • Exhibit Proficiency in Critical Analysis of literary texts

Specifically, after successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

    • Create effective oral and written arguments
    • Organize thoughts logically and coherently both orally and in writing
    • Demonstrate familiarity with the genre of Monster literature
    • Conduct Library Research effectively
    • Evaluate sources, incorporate ideas and texts of others, while avoiding plagiarism
    • Write persuasively and in depth on a topic of their own choosing

 

Required texts:

Modern and Contemporary Irish Drama by John P. Harrington ISBN-13: 978-0393932430
Irish Women Playwrights 1900-1939 by Cathy Leeney ISBN-13: 978-1433103322
Additional readings may be assigned.

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ENGL 4070/5070
WGS 4070/5070
Iconoclastic Women Writers

Wake a question. Eat an instant, answer.
--Gertrude Stein, Tender Buttons

This course will focus on fiction, but will also include autobiographical writings and essays written by women whose writing and whose lives defied conventions and norms of the U.S. and the U.K. during the first half of the twentieth-century. We will consider:  How do these female writers influence and challenge the generic conventions of the day vis-à-vis literary regionalism, realism, naturalism, modernism, and sentimentalism? How does their writing speak to larger cultural-political movements such as suffrage, civil rights, anti-colonial struggles, immigration rights, sexual liberation and labor organizing? As such we will read works by authors such as Gertrude Stein, Edith Wharton, Virginia Woolf, Nella Larsen, Zitkala-Sa, Jean Rhys, Emma Goldman, Zora Neale Hurston, Carson McCullers, and Hisaye Yamamoto. While the significance of gender will be central to our discussions, we will take an intersectional approach to understanding their lives and their work, paying close attention to issues of race/ethnicity, class, and sexuality as well.

POTENTIAL TEXTS: Gertrude Stein, The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas; Edith Wharton, The House of Mirth; Virginia Woolf, Orlando; Nella Larsen, Quicksand; Emma Goldman, Red Emma Speaks; Jean Rhys, After Leaving Mr. Mackenzie; Carson McCullers, The Ballad of the Sad Café and other stories

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FTA 4096.2/5096.2
Solo Performance

This course requires students to experiment with a variety of methods for developing original material for solo performance. Material generated will encompass a variety of solo performance modes, including autobiographical, character driven, and adaptation. Students will learn how to present their personal work in monologue form with a special focus on translating the written word into the language of theatrical performance. The semester’s work will culminate with a public showing – undergraduates will present a five-minute piece; graduate students will perform an 8-10 minute piece.

Emphasis will be placed on development of the artist’s persona, voice, and point of view. Students will be exposed to the work of solo performance artists such as Anna Deavere Smith and Mike Daisey. Graduate students will make class presentations on a piece of solo theatre. Students will also develop a greater understanding of the art form’s relevance within contemporary theatre, and be empowered to create self-generated works of theatre.

 

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FTA 4591/5591
Ireland in Cinema

This course will examine films by native and International directors which are set in and filmed in the country where we are studying. How do these films compare in their portrayal of the landscape, culture and people? The classes will combine screenings, discussions and field trips (to filming locations and other film related excursions).

 

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MANG 4497/5497
Social Media for Professional & Strategic Communication

Social media is without doubt the hot keyword for strategic communication. But what is and isn’t social media? How do we define it? What are the different branches and types of social media, and more importantly, how should we use it? Are there ways we can curate social media content to better generate web traffic and increase awareness? These are all some of the questions this course attempts to explore.  

In this course we will attempt identify the different types of social media and discuss when and how to use these tools. We will then move on to examine real-life case studies in various fields of communication (i.e., personal branding, organizational crisis, public health, international sports, public affairs, consumer relations, etc.) and analyze social media in action. We will also discuss the ethical application of social media technology and learn how to use and author content for such online strategic communication tools ourselves. Some social media applications we will cover are, but not limited to: social networking sites (e.g., facebook), blogs, micro-blogs (e.g., Twitter), wikis, viral video (e.g., YouTube, Vine), and content sharing sites (e.g., instagram, snapchat, pinterest, buzzfeed).  


By the end of this course:
1. Students will understand how social media applications can be used in a variety of professional setting
2. Students will become familiar with how communication practitioners use different social media to communicate with an organization’s target audience
3. Students will become familiar with and develop skills to use social media tools and curate social media content for organizations and personal branding
4. Students will participate ethically and effectively in social media with an awareness of legal and ethical implications of their use


There is no textbook required for this course. Weekly readings will be posted every Friday as PDFs or links. The readings will be a mixture of academic journal articles, industry reports, news and magazine articles, blog posts, and case studies.

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ENGL 4391 or FTA 3090
Directed Study
/Internship

Admission by permission of Academic Director and advising professor. Qualifying undergraduate students may take 3 hours of Directed Study in the genre of their choice. Counts toward nine-credit summer course limit.

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ENGL 6397 or FTA 6090
Directed Study
/Internship

Admission by permission of Academic Director and advising professor. Qualifying graduate students may take 3 hours of Directed Study in the genre of their choice. Counts toward nine-credit summer course limit.

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ENGL 7000
Thesis Research

Admission by permission of Academic Director. Qualifying UNO MFA students may take 3 hours of Thesis Research. Counts toward nine-credit summer course limit.

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All for-credit students will receive a transcript for their participation.  This official transcript can be sent to the appropriate home institution at the participant's request, after a final assessment and payment of room damages and other remaining charges.  If you have any questions about the transcript process, please feel free to contact the Writing Workshops Abroad office.


 

For more information about the Writing Workshops Abroad, please contact:
Program Coordinator, Jarred Marlatt, Division of International Education
writingabroad@uno.edu | 504-280-7345 | (During Program) 353 894 976 697

 

University of New Orleans, Division of International Education, 2000 Lakeshore Dr., New Orleans LA 70148
phone 504-280-7116; fax 504-280-7317; e-mail isp@uno.edu

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